Jul 01 2014
Robots are always part of the future. Little bits of that future break off and become part of the present, but when that happens, those bits cease to be “robots.” In 1945, a modern dishwasher would have been a miracle, as exotic as the space-age appliances in The Jetsons. But now, it’s just a dishwasher

159 notes

May 13 2014
Entrepreneurs, doing something that matters to you more than money is a great way to succeed because even if you don’t succeed, the world will be in a better place.

-Tim O’Reilly, founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media

In this Stanford University Entrepreneurship Corner podcast, O’Reilly shares 10 important lessons for startups: http://stnfd.biz/nXBG3 

(via stanfordbusiness)

108 notes

May 12 2014
Old/New — What is the oldest O’Reilly book you still have?  What is the newest?  Pictured here is Jon Johns 1st, TCP/IP from 1998 and the newest Creating Apps in Kivy.  Share your pictures.

Old/New — What is the oldest O’Reilly book you still have?  What is the newest?  Pictured here is Jon Johns 1st, TCP/IP from 1998 and the newest Creating Apps in Kivy.  Share your pictures.

2 notes

May 12

Anonymous said: Have you considered adding - or at least Photoshopping - googly eyes to any of the O'Reilly books? Most of their books - though not all of the books on the site - have interesting animals on the covers ... tag them as something like "O'Googly" :-) - Len

googlyeyebooks:

Like this?

image

93 notes

May 12
Some of the saddest moments of my childhood were picking up one of your O’Reilly books, only to be disappointed to find that the cool animal on the cover appeared nowhere inside.
— My son, Jake (via 120pagemonster)

9 notes

May 12

wideopenlens:

Day 2 - O’Reilly Fluent Conference, Chinatown, City Lights bookstore, Coit Tower / Telegraph Hill

2 notes

May 12

sensefinity:

Tim O’Reilley and the Internet of Things

2 notes

May 12
prairie-cybrarian:

The colors are linked to the topics. Here’s a general color key:
Web Design/Development: Teal Programming: Magenta Perl: Turquoise blue Java: Dark purple Apple: Light purple System and Network Admin: Dark blue Windows: Royal blue Security: Yellow Oracle: Orange Data: Bright red Mobile: Grassy green Linux: Warm brown-red In a Nutshell references: Rust red metallic
As topics morph and/or grow, we may introduce new colors and retire others. For example, you’ll find some Data titles in the Programming group (we will change the color to our relatively new Data red when we reprint those titles).
-Edie Freedman, Creative Director at O’Reilly

prairie-cybrarian:

The colors are linked to the topics. Here’s a general color key:

Web Design/Development: Teal
Programming: Magenta
Perl: Turquoise blue
Java: Dark purple
Apple: Light purple
System and Network Admin: Dark blue
Windows: Royal blue
Security: Yellow
Oracle: Orange
Data: Bright red
Mobile: Grassy green
Linux: Warm brown-red
In a Nutshell references: Rust red metallic

As topics morph and/or grow, we may introduce new colors and retire others. For example, you’ll find some Data titles in the Programming group (we will change the color to our relatively new Data red when we reprint those titles).

-Edie Freedman, Creative Director at O’Reilly

8 notes

May 09 2014
joelbenjaminillustration:

Portrait of Tim O’Reilly for the latest issue of Hacker Monthly.
Thanks to Lim Cheng Soon, AD.

joelbenjaminillustration:

Portrait of Tim O’Reilly for the latest issue of Hacker Monthly.

Thanks to Lim Cheng Soon, AD.

10 notes

May 07 2014
If we’re going to get science policy right, it’s really important for us to study the economic benefit of open access and not accept the arguments of incumbents. Existing media companies claim that they need ever stronger and longer copyright protection and new, draconian laws to protect them, and meanwhile, new free ecosystems, like the Web, have actually led to enormous wealth creation and enormous new opportunities for social value. And yes, they did in fact lead in some cases to the destruction of incumbents, but that’s the kind of creative destruction that we should celebrate in the economy. We have to accept that, particularly in the area of science, there’s an incredible opportunity for open access to enable new business models.
Tim O’Reilly on "the Clothesline Paradox", timely and enormously important. (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

218 notes

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